Bill to prohibit contract abandonment in Imo goes to committee stage

Rochas Okorocha

Lawmakers spoke in support of the bill.

The Imo House of Assembly on Tuesday in Owerri set up a three-member committee to handle a bill for a law to prohibit contract abandonment in the state.

The decision followed a motion moved by the member representing Mbaitoli State Constituency, Victor Ndunagu.

Mr. Ndunagu said the bill was to check contracts abandonment and poor execution of contracts in the state. The lawmaker said the bill was necessitated due to the tradition of abandoning contracts by contractors.

He said the bill, when passed into law, would mandate government to complete all abandoned projects of the past administration which had been paid for.

According to him, viable projects initiated by governments are abandoned after the inauguration of a new administration, which brings about huge economic waste.

Innocent Ekeh of Owerri West Constituency supported the bill and suggested that contractors signed maintenance agreements when contracts were awarded.

He said that the bill should contain an enforcement clause and called for monitoring of government projects.

Pat Ekeji of Aboh Mbaise Constituency said the bill should also target government functionaries, adding that sometimes contracts were awarded many times and remained unexecuted.

Robertson Ekwebelem, representing Onuimo Constituency, said the bill was timely as it would also reduce corruption.

The Speaker of the House, Benjamin Uwajumogu, ruled that the bill should go to the committee stage for more inputs.

(NAN)


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