CPC threatens to take Adamawa Assembly to court

The Congress for Progressive Change (CPC), in Adamawa State, has threatened to go to court to seek the dissolution of the Adamawa State House of Assembly because the parliament has become an “assembly of members that don’t represent the wishes of the people that elected them into office”.

Ibrahim Waziri, the state chairman of the CPC, who stated his party’s position on the state of affairs in the state, at a press conference at the party secretariat, Thursday, said his party would go to court to seek the “dissolution of the assembly” following its investigations that the assembly has not sat for up to the constitutional 181 days they are supposed to meet in a session.

Mr. Waziri said the assembly which was inaugurated on the June 9, 2011 and which ended its session on the June 24 2012, had 91 as a total vote of proceedings for the session.

Mr. Waziri says this is reason enough for the CPC to head to court.

The party also cited the hurried passage of the bill amending the Local Government Establishment and Administrative Law 2000 by the lawmakers, as one of the reasons for levelling its charge of “incompetence and non-representation” on the lawmakers.

He urged the state government to disregard the law and demanded that the lawmakers revise their stand on the bill.

According to him, the bill hurriedly passed by the lawmakers, three days ago, seeks to provide for the constitution of an electoral college to elect management committee for the 3rd tier of government in the state, pending the conduct of elections by the state’s Independent electoral commission. The CPC claims the law, as amended by the assembly, only serves the wishes of the executive; guaranteeing its continued control over the local councils in the state under a “caretaker arrangement without holding proper elections.”

The speaker of the Adamawa Assembly, Ahmed Fintiri, has however rebutted the claims of the opposition; stating instead that it has sat for upward of 200 days, and that the contentious bill passed by the assembly was not in breach of the constitution.

Mr. Finitri insisted that the law would rather help to resolve a peculiar situation in the state where most of the caretaker heads at the councils, made mostly of civil servants who are not necessarily members of the council, are made to superintend over those councils.

Local Government Councils in Adamawa state have been without elected officials for 13 months, since the tenure of the last council chairmen and their counsellors elapsed in March 2011.


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