Boko Haram: Nigeria gets N580 million UN funding for humanitarian services

The United Nations on Tuesday announced the provision of about N580 million in aid of the humanitarian operations in the Boko Haram infested North-East of Nigeria.

The Head of the UN Central Emergency Response Fund, CERF, Valerie Amos, said the provision of $3.5 million (about N580 million) was based on the recent assessment by the National Emergency Management Agency, NEMA.

NEMA, the Nigerian agency responsible for the management of emergency situations as a result of disater, had reported that more than 740,000 people have been displaced by violence between Boko Haram insurgents and security forces in Nigeria since January 2014.

The agency said majority of the people affected have sought refuge within host communities where they face increasingly squalid health and poor sanitation conditions.

“The Humanitarian Country Team prioritized CERF funds to respond to protection, health and water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) needs of the displaced people and host communities of North East Nigeria,” the UN Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator for Nigeria, Daouda Toure, said.

Mr. Troure said the interventions would be implemented in Yobe and Borno States, which are currently bearing the brunt of the conflict in the region.

The CERF funds, Mr. Troure said, would cover components of the Nigeria Strategic Response Plan (SRP) for 2014 that have not attracted adequate funding, including $808,893 for health, $1.3 Million for WASH and $1,437,815 for protection.

Of the $93.4 million requested through the Nigeria SRP, only 13 per cent has been received so far.

“This grant is part of a $75 million allocation from the second of two annual rounds of allocations from the CERF Underfunded Emergencies window which this year aimed to boost relief work in two of the world’s most neglected regions: the West African Sahel and the Horn of Africa,” the head of the UN agency said.

This latest allocation, he said, brings total CERF funding for Nigeria in 2014 to $5 million. In September, CERF helped aid agencies in Nigeria responded to the Ebola crisis with $1.5 million support.

The CERF pools donor contribution in a single fund so that money was available to start or continue urgent relief work.

Since 2006, CERF has allocated more than $14.7 million to Nigeria as part of the response to various crises. These resources have helped save lives and strengthen the response capacity of the humanitarian community.


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  • amazing2012

    UN contribution for PDP 2015 campaign. What measures do you put in place to ensure accountability and transferacy. It will better if the UN will sent materials requested than to send money to thieves.

  • Truthometer

    N580 million is going to the war chest of Dumbo and PDP to prosecute the 2015 presidential election. This is a dis-service to the people that are in dire need of the humanitarian assistance. This is ill timed.

  • Modibbo Adamu

    Only the fat necks will enjoy the humanitarian services not the actual victims

  • Nwazaion Nonso

    Ironsi did not release the coup plotters, neither the tribunal had any verdict over their incarceration nor release. it was britain who sponsored the counter coup against ironsi to make sure power return to north. they used the yoruba to betray him, and he was assassinated in yoruba land.

    • Chris

      You people will never want to learn anything. If Britain sponsored the north against ironsi, who then sponsored the Igbo soldiers to embark on the killing spree against the north? You will gloss over the pertinent issue, choosing rather the path of victimization.

      • Nwazaion Nonso

        Immediately after the assassination of Ironsi, Gen. Yakubu gowon mobilized and released the military and civilians against the civilian igbos, following the mass murdering of igbo military officers in the north. it was declared a nation wide massacred against the igbos the agenda was northernization, meaning ”Sharia” the only solution to drive the igbos our of the north. simply because the igbos sponsored the nigeria independence movement, with her resources. the igbos were perceived dominating all the nigeria civil services, schools, hospitals and business due to their unique skills. the igbos have always been a challenge to her contemporary tribes due to life styles, and belief. a trait to british colonialism and tax imposition. there were transatlantic war also known as Aro war before nigeria amalgamation. we fought ekumeku against the british invasion. the problem is owner resources, like our crude oil today, our palm oil. we have stopped the exploitation of our coal proceeding ABa women riot 1929. so all these challenges. we were in the fore front for emancipating and uniting one africa with our wealth. we called our movement pan africa. the north were used as distraction against the movement.

        • Olusegun

          You obviously reason from the anus, and so are other Igbos like you. When your soldiers killed innocent civilians and soldiers from other tribe, and deliberately spared their own, you did not see anything bad in it. I am somewhat happy that you Igbos pay for your sins and will continue to do so. As for the Yorubas betraying Ironsi, you must be on cheap drugs to even insinuate such. The gallant soldier called Fajuyi laid down his life for your useless and coward Ironsi. Rmember, Danjuma and co appealed to him to release Ironsi but he refused, telling them Ironsi was his guest, and that he would rather die than to hand him over. Here you are now spewing falsehood and gibberish.

          The typical Igbo guy will always want to twist story and event in order to suit them

          • Nwazaion Nonso

            I don’t argue with fools who have no point to make. the first pogrom against the igbos in the north was in 1945.

          • Olusegun

            Was the pogrom before independence? You seem to be confused in your attempt to denigrate other tribes and promote your own. If there was pogrom in 1945, who do you hold responsible? the white men or Yoruba or Hausa? Honestly, having a discussion with you is a waste of time, given your cerebral incapacity, neurotic deficiency and cataclysmic tendency. You are thereby confined to cesspit of hole

          • Nwazaion Nonso

            Britain obviously knew the imbalance in their creation. the pogrom happened before nigeria independence, and british government sealed it.

        • Dele Awogbeoba

          The January 15 Anniversary, Biafra And The de Ja Vu Factor

          January 15, 2016

          As Nigeria approaches the 15 of January 2016, echoes of the massacre and killings of top Northern and Western Nigerian soldiers and top Northern, Western and Mid Western politicians comes back to mind. The events of that day set in motion a cascade of events that left in its wake many deaths, changes to the political structure of Nigeria and fundamental changes to the fiscal structure of Nigeria.

          Some of the changes emanating from those terrible events turned out to be positive. Prior to 1963, Nigeria had 3 regions. Those regions were being led by the respective majority tribes in those regions. The minority groups in those regions were suffering untold neglect and different degrees of discrimination. The minorities of the west campaigned for and was granted a mid west region. The minorities of the East embarked upon Nigeria’s first secession attempt that was brutally put down by Ironsi in 1966 and the North was plagued by the incessant riots by the Tivs and other Northern minorities prior to 1966. The creation of states by Gowon freed the minorities from the oppressive grip of the Northern and Eastern majority tribes and simultaneously tightened the noose around the neck of the rebellious eastern region. The Mid west had been “freed” in 1963.

          As the ghost of Biafra again starts to rear its head, certain similarities can be discerned. In 1960 the Eastern dominated NCNC had been in an alliance with the Northern centered NPC. The relative lack of a skilled Northern work force available to the North ensured that most of the skilled working force of Northern extraction were being employed in the Northern region civil service. Ahmadu Bello was concerned to ensure that Northerners were fully employed in the bureaucracy of the Northern region. This meant that the NCNC was left to fill the jobs in the federal bureaucracy with persons of igbo descent without much push back from the Northern dominated NPC. Jaja Wachuku (the federal Education minister) used that power and space to appoint Eni Njoku and Kenneth Dike as the first vice chancellors’ of the Universities of Lagos and Ibadan respectively. The NCNC also influenced the choice of Ironsi as new GOC of the Nigerian army by the Prime Minister over the heads of the more experienced officers with brigade experience at the time. Ademulegun and Ogundipe were recommended to the Prime Minister by the last British GOC of the Nigerian army General Welby -Everard as his more capable replacements (page 243 of the Nigerian Military by Robin Luckham).

          The 1964 elections changed matters considerably. The NPC had switched alliance partners from the NCNC to the western region based Nigerian National Democratic Party (“NNDP”). All attempts by Zik to cancel or impede the recognition of that election was thwarted. The relative lack of power concentrated in the office of the President of the Nigeria became all the more apparent. The NNDP took its place at the centre. Akinjide (as the new Education minister) wasted no time changing Eni Njoku with the Cambridge educated Saburi Biobaku. The igbo were fast seeing events moving where its position within the federal government was being threatened by a new alliance between the Northern NPC and the western NNDP. A coup was executed mainly by igbo majors with the assistance of lower cadre officers of different ethnicities unaware of the motives behind the coup plotters actions. Some of the junior non igbo officers believed they were going on a routine training course whilst others were asked a day before to participate in the coup.

          It so happened that Zik’s cousin (Ifeajuna) was a lead participant in the coup. It was no coincidence that Zik went missing for over a month until after the coup was given effect to. All people that were political opponents of Zik were gruesomely murdered (whether they be Okotie Eboh within the NCNC or Ahmadu Bello, Tafawa Belewa and Akintola of the NCNC and NNDP respectively).

          Fast forward to today. Again we have a situation where Jonathans’ government had empowered the igbo to such an extent that most of the truly powerful positions within the Jonathan led federal government were being held by the igbo. Again, political events have thrown up an unlikely and unforeseen change in government. The North and West are now back in the centre of political power and the East is feeling the chill wind of relative lack of power at the federal level under a democratic dispensation.

          Like 1965, the igbo have found this state of affairs difficult to comprehend or grapple with. It lacks the people in the army to effect the violent change of government so the 1966 option no longer exists. Its next course has been to threaten secession. Its major problem is it lacks any leverage within the Nigerian socio political structure. The west controlls the economy of Nigeria and could and did ground Nigeria down during the Abiola crisis. The Niger delta’s resources feeds the entire country. It could and did shut the taps off during the MEND crisis. Nigeria had to discuss a more equitable derivation formula. That policy discussion is still ongoing.

          The igbo has no such leverage. The economy of the east contributes less than 5% to Nigeria’s GDP. Its people have made a habit of migrating to the four corners of Nigeria to make a living. The country is aware that the SE has insufficient land to house all igbos and if it does manage to contain the igbos there will be no land left to farm for the purposes of feeding such a massive population. It’s need to facilitate easy egress from the SE has made the need for a second Niger bridge a more compelling South East interest for the elites of the igbo than lobbying the federal government for funds to be expended on curbing ravaging effects of large scale erosion within the South East itself.

          In a bid to force the Federal Government to take its feelings of neglect seriously, it has opted to attempt to annex not only the liberated parts of the former minority areas of the Eastern region but has added the delta part of the former mid western region. It has tried to turn back the clock of the Biafran defeat and ejection from the former mid west. The igbo dominated IPOB, MOSSOB and BIM now say that despite the near 100% igbo leadership at all levels of all the three organisations, the Biafran struggle is not somehow an igbo struggle but a “biafran” struggle whilst at the same time referencing as their gripe the lack of a 6th state for the South East and the use of federal character for admissions into federal universities (a position ignored by the University of Nigeria Nnsuka). It has ignored the fact that Bayelsa, Cross River, Ebonyi and Rivers are states that had relatively low scores in the tests results that so infuriated the igbo South East. In a nutshell, the Nigerian policies which is giving birth to the new agitation of Biafra are things that uniquely affect the igbos.

          The federal government appears to be acting fast. It plans to site a new division of the army in the South South. That is only part of the solution. It must allow greater fiscal federalism within Nigeria. More power should be devolved to the states that allows all states to exploit the resources within their domains. Each state knows their domains better than the federal government. Nigeria has so much oil, gas and solid mineral resources that can be harnessed by a truly serious state government. Each state is blessed with some natural material and human resource that can be efficiently exploited.

          The federal government needs to step back and allow the state governments take more control. It can manage and regulate extraction in order to safeguard the environment and have a split in the proceeds of such extraction (50% say). The federal government cannot however run away from this needed institutional reform. It will force many rich states to become rich in actuality. At this point, there is no logical case for any further state creation. The political bureaucracy is large enough. Focus however needs to be placed firmly on fiscal change. Gowon embarked on political change days before Nigeria faced its second secession attempt. I hope President Buhari does not wait to such a time to review Nigeria’s fiscal construction.

          www[dot]theheraldng[dot]com/the-january-16-coup-anniversary-biafra-and-the-de-ja-vu-factor/

          • Nwazaion Nonso

            This is absolute trash. the reason why the igbos migrated to north is because there was no monumental development in the region after the exploitation of the land. most development and administrative blocks were concentrated in the north, while the north rejected western education. the action colonial exploitation of the igbo resources and tax imposition instigated aba women riot in 1929. there was economic embargo in the region even till date due to the role of Aro during slave trade, and numerous resistance against british invasion. there were always strive and disagreement. then following the the fall of ekumuku, the igbos / east were the last to be integrated into the contraption called nigeria. there was noting like minority in the east. the idea of middle west / south south was to conquer and divide igbo land as to have asses to her resources. even up till date, the igbo hinter land still remained unconquered enemy territory. it was due to the way nigeria was structured by colonial master to use the resource of the east to balance the impoverished north. this is the reason why the britan sponsored the war against the east. the notion that igbo contributed only 5% to nation economy is nonsense. the example is very clear at buhari administration. he bound importation and suddenly nigeria economy collapsed. it is the igbo who dominated in nigeria entrepreneurship.

    • Raymond

      So it was Adekunle Fajuyi that died with him is the one that betrayed him. 98% of the first Nigerian coup executors were igbos, that is why the assertion of ” 2 million igbos died during civil war” never move me.

  • Olisa

    Frightening harrowing story. May we never see political violence like this in Nigeria again. Goodluck Jonathan will go down in history for declaring the ‘ambition of any politician is not worth the blood of a single Nigerian’. Buhari meanwhile must refrain from his political witch hunts. They have the potential to incite another spiral of violence.

    • joe

      Olisa?? which one, Metuh??? Where are you writing from? How market for “yonder”?

  • San Patch

    The 1966 coup–led by Nzeogwu and Ifejuana–was as immoral as it was inept. Imagine the horror of seeing your father killed in front of your eyes. Imagine the wives, children, dependents, loved ones slaughtered in cold blood. The body of the Prime Minister dumped outside the city of Lagos. What a shameful, immoral thing. Those who support Nzeogwu’s coup because his motives, it is claimed, were noble miss the point completely. Nzeogwu’s coup was an immoral act against unarmed, defenceless people.

    In addition to the immorality of the coup, how about the strategy? What did Nzeogwu think would happen after he had killed off the heads of the different elite groups? Did he do any strategic analysis? Did he think about how Hausa, Ibo, minority elite would react? Oh no. He didn’t. Did he expect them to embrace him as the herald of change? If so, on what planet was he living?

    And the consequences for Nigeria? A counter-coup, a terrible civil war, social dislocation, violence, plunder, rape, tears, blood, suspicion, ethnic hatred. What a horrible, terrible legacy. If you think Nzeogwu is a hero, please think again.

  • Dele Awogbeoba

    The January 15 Anniversary, Biafra And The de Ja Vu Factor

    By Dele Awogbeoba

    January 15, 2016

    As Nigeria approaches the 15 of January 2016, echoes of the massacre and killings of top Northern and Western Nigerian soldiers and top Northern, Western and Mid Western politicians comes back to mind. The events of that day set in motion a cascade of events that left in its wake many deaths, changes to the political structure of Nigeria and fundamental changes to the fiscal structure of Nigeria.

    Some of the changes emanating from those terrible events turned out to be positive. Prior to 1963, Nigeria had 3 regions. Those regions were being led by the respective majority tribes in those regions. The minority groups in those regions were suffering untold neglect and different degrees of discrimination. The minorities of the west campaigned for and was granted a mid west region. The minorities of the East embarked upon Nigeria’s first secession attempt that was brutally put down by Ironsi in 1966 and the North was plagued by the incessant riots by the Tivs and other Northern minorities prior to 1966. The creation of states by Gowon freed the minorities from the oppressive grip of the Northern and Eastern majority tribes and simultaneously tightened the noose around the neck of the rebellious eastern region. The Mid west had been “freed” in 1963.

    As the ghost of Biafra again starts to rear its head, certain similarities can be discerned. In 1960 the Eastern dominated NCNC had been in an alliance with the Northern centered NPC. The relative lack of a skilled Northern work force available to the North ensured that most of the skilled working force of Northern extraction were being employed in the Northern region civil service. Ahmadu Bello was concerned to ensure that Northerners were fully employed in the bureaucracy of the Northern region. This meant that the NCNC was left to fill the jobs in the federal bureaucracy with persons of igbo descent without much push back from the Northern dominated NPC. Jaja Wachuku (the federal Education minister) used that power and space to appoint Eni Njoku and Kenneth Dike as the first vice chancellors’ of the Universities of Lagos and Ibadan respectively. The NCNC also influenced the choice of Ironsi as new GOC of the Nigerian army by the Prime Minister over the heads of the more experienced officers with brigade experience at the time. Ademulegun and Ogundipe were recommended to the Prime Minister by the last British GOC of the Nigerian army General Welby -Everard as his more capable replacements (page 243 of the Nigerian Military by Robin Luckham).

    The 1964 elections changed matters considerably. The NPC had switched alliance partners from the NCNC to the western region based Nigerian National Democratic Party (“NNDP”). All attempts by Zik to cancel or impede the recognition of that election was thwarted. The relative lack of power concentrated in the office of the President of the Nigeria became all the more apparent. The NNDP took its place at the centre. Akinjide (as the new Education minister) wasted no time changing Eni Njoku with the Cambridge educated Saburi Biobaku. The igbo were fast seeing events moving where its position within the federal government was being threatened by a new alliance between the Northern NPC and the western NNDP. A coup was executed mainly by igbo majors with the assistance of lower cadre officers of different ethnicities unaware of the motives behind the coup plotters actions. Some of the junior non igbo officers believed they were going on a routine training course whilst others were asked a day before to participate in the coup.

    It so happened that Zik’s cousin (Ifeajuna) was a lead participant in the coup. It was no coincidence that Zik went missing for over a month until after the coup was given effect to. All people that were political opponents of Zik were gruesomely murdered (whether they be Okotie Eboh within the NCNC or Ahmadu Bello, Tafawa Belewa and Akintola of the NCNC and NNDP respectively).

    Fast forward to today. Again we have a situation where Jonathans’ government had empowered the igbo to such an extent that most of the truly powerful positions within the Jonathan led federal government were being held by the igbo. Again, political events have thrown up an unlikely and unforeseen change in government. The North and West are now back in the centre of political power and the East is feeling the chill wind of relative lack of power at the federal level under a democratic dispensation.

    Like 1965, the igbo have found this state of affairs difficult to comprehend or grapple with. It lacks the people in the army to effect the violent change of government so the 1966 option no longer exists. Its next course has been to threaten secession. Its major problem is it lacks any leverage within the Nigerian socio political structure. The west controlls the economy of Nigeria and could and did ground Nigeria down during the Abiola crisis. The Niger delta’s resources feeds the entire country. It could and did shut the taps off during the MEND crisis. Nigeria had to discuss a more equitable derivation formula. That policy discussion is still ongoing.

    The igbo has no such leverage. The economy of the east contributes less than 5% to Nigeria’s GDP. Its people have made a habit of migrating to the four corners of Nigeria to make a living. The country is aware that the SE has insufficient land to house all igbos and if it does manage to contain the igbos there will be no land left to farm for the purposes of feeding such a massive population. It’s need to facilitate easy egress from the SE has made the need for a second Niger bridge a more compelling South East interest for the elites of the igbo than lobbying the federal government for funds to be expended on curbing ravaging effects of large scale erosion within the South East itself.

    In a bid to force the Federal Government to take its feelings of neglect seriously, it has opted to attempt to annex not only the liberated parts of the former minority areas of the Eastern region but has added the delta part of the former mid western region. It has tried to turn back the clock of the Biafran defeat and ejection from the former mid west. The igbo dominated IPOB, MOSSOB and BIM now say that despite the near 100% igbo leadership at all levels of all the three organisations, the Biafran struggle is not somehow an igbo struggle but a “biafran” struggle whilst at the same time referencing as their gripe the lack of a 6th state for the South East and the use of federal character for admissions into federal universities (a position ignored by the University of Nigeria Nnsuka). It has ignored the fact that Bayelsa, Cross River, Ebonyi and Rivers are states that had relatively low scores in the tests results that so infuriated the igbo South East. In a nutshell, the Nigerian policies which is giving birth to the new agitation of Biafra are things that uniquely affect the igbos.

    The federal government appears to be acting fast. It plans to site a new division of the army in the South South. That is only part of the solution. It must allow greater fiscal federalism within Nigeria. More power should be devolved to the states that allows all states to exploit the resources within their domains. Each state knows their domains better than the federal government. Nigeria has so much oil, gas and solid mineral resources that can be harnessed by a truly serious state government. Each state is blessed with some natural material and human resource that can be efficiently exploited.

    The federal government needs to step back and allow the state governments take more control. It can manage and regulate extraction in order to safeguard the environment and have a split in the proceeds of such extraction (50% say). The federal government cannot however run away from this needed institutional reform. It will force many rich states to become rich in actuality. At this point, there is no logical case for any further state creation. The political bureaucracy is large enough. Focus however needs to be placed firmly on fiscal change. Gowon embarked on political change days before Nigeria faced its second secession attempt. I hope President Buhari does not wait to such a time to review Nigeria’s fiscal construction.

    www[dot]theheraldng[dot]com/the-january-16-coup-anniversary-biafra-and-the-de-ja-vu-factor/

  • joe

    “..Chief Remilekun Fani-Kayode, the Deputy Premier of the old Western
    Region. What I witnessed that night was traumatic and devastating for me
    and my family…..”. The most important questions here are that –

    Did you learn anything from that night?. Do your utterances, behavior, lifestyle, political affiliations and your body language show that you learned anything about injustice and brutality. Did you not join other thieves in looting this same country almost to death in last few years, depriving other Nigerian children right to decent livelihood? Do you know how many lives have been destroyed by what you represent? And Finally and most importantly, have you lived your life such that the same nemesis and anger that was visited on your father as a result of his actions will not be visited on you for representing the same thing he represented.? – Lies, Impunity, Attempt at utilizing education to take other folk for a ride(instead of using it to build a society), corruption, crime etc..? I would have expected you to mention at least a single lesson that was learned by you from that day!!

    • San Patch

      What vile nonsense are you spouting? You may not like FFK–and you are not alone in that. But what has the violence that Nzeogwu’s coup inflicted on the man’s family (and those of other Nigerians) got to do with FFK’s subsequent career? How did FFK senir deserve the ‘nemesis and anger’ that Nzeogwu and co inflicted on him?

  • Inspiration to write this article came naturally not from substance, this is why the article make some senses.
    You don’t killed people of a region in mass murder and expect their kinsmen to fold their hands. Igbo officers that killed officers and politicians of Northern and western extraction are the people that derailed this country to her present sorry state. Were it not for them, there won’t be counter-coup and pogrom of Igbo that led to civil war

    • San Patch

      Abi, you kill people and then you expect their Northern and western kinsmen to welcome you with open arms? What kind of Indian Hemp did Nzeogwu and co smoke that they were so deluded? Mtscheeew.

  • vincentumenyiora

    CAN YOU GET THE ORIENTATION PEOPLE TO LISTEN TO ‘THE HOUR OF SALVATION!’ ON TV Channel 591!

    jendor and Olusamjide – The curious question about this article amongst other concerns is: Why has Fani Kayode come up with this kind of article after 50 years of the even if not due to his continued mischievous disposition of disrespect and irresponsible attacks on
    sensitive matters making him look irresponsible when he engages in such discourse – the kind of disposition of here today gone tomorrow? We heard Obasanjo harp about need for a ‘revolution’ for Nigeria in one of his address to the youths and when he was reminded about the use of the ‘word’, he quickly denied he ever used the word to describe what he meant – that is leadership quality for Nigeria – the ‘here today gone tomorrow disposition!’ The young officers could have used the same word/ phrase ‘revolution for Nigeria’ and you referred to the 2015 as one for Nigeria you intuitively forget that the trouble started in the Western House – Alhaji Tanko Yakassai just told us a bit of the causes of the problems! I urged people from Chief Adelabu Adegoke and Chief Adeniron Ogunsanya, older than Fani Kayode to tell us clearly what they can remember was the in-house problems within the Western Region’s House of Assembly then – their memoir which will be accepted as more authentic, so that persons like Fani Kayode himself will have the correct information – he was only six at the time!

    I HAVE APPROACHED COOMENT FOR THIS ARTICLE FROM THE ANGLE THAT NIGERIA SHOULD BY NOW COME OF AGE SUCH THAT POLITICIANS WE NEED FROM NOW ON MUST BE MADE TO FACE THE PEOPLE WITH GENUINE COMMITMENTS TO DELIVER FOR THEM WHAT IS PROMISED IN CAMPAIGNS NOT
    THROUGH FRIVOLOUS GRAFTS BUT THROUGH BEING SEEN TO BE FORTHRIGHT AND SERIOUS! WE DON’T WANT ANYMORE GERRYMANDERING WHEREBY PEOPLE LIKE FANI KAYODE WOULD PICK UP THEIR PENS AND WRITE VERBIAGE IN THE HOPE TO DECIEVE AND DISTRACT OR HOODWINCK THE ELECTORATES! COUP OR NO COUP AS HE SAID, WHAT WE NEED IN NIGERIA IS THOSE WHO CAN PERFORM CREDITABLY TO THE EXPECTATIONS OF THE PEOPLE IRRESPECTIVE OF THEIR POLITICAL LEANINGS, FOLKS!

    I mean consider my position in Nigeria, I do not belong to any political party even though I am entitled to do so but see what I have delivered for use across board most have been adopted and being applied in specific areas and all those who have the opportunity and are voted for cannot do as much but engage in futile campaigns of acrimony and attrition! People like Fani Kayode and others in Yoruba land especially when they feel they cannot get the kind of attention they aspire for they then retire to using or fanning the ambers of hatred and derogatory campaigns against their opponents! Log onto my website below and see what I did for Nigeria – by which means I am challenging anybody including Fani Kayode to show Nigerians what contributions they have made other than his periodic and obvious derogatory insunuations of hatred against their follow Nigerians!

    I mean we had the Confab meeting, which the group in Yoruba nation craved for in that PRONACO but they failed to attend when the time came in their characteristic ploy to appear as diplomatic – always prepared to change their minds whenever there is the opportunity for Nigeria to forge ahead on important issues and they feel they would be outwitted! You find that the group will ever renege in all that was agreed amazingly they call it diplomacy but I term the act deceitful therefore ‘deplomocrazy’ instead – very slippery attitude, here today gone tomorrow! There is certainly something behind his new resurgence forgetting that we have not dealt with his insults (swipe) on President Buhari’s Certificate saga!

    Our saving grace is that TSA) (policy which Buhari succeeded in procuring before his administration took off in earnest – you’ll be surprised it is part solutions in my congratulatory letter for the President dated 4th June 2015! It was first suggested in 1988/9 and for Chief Earnest Shonekan in 1993 – you can see how we are not responding to solutions for Nigeria’s problems early enough – goes to confirm my: Who do you tell in Nigeria and he/she is willing/ ready to act and do so early! I want to see how much Fani Kayode contributed in Nigeria other than posting innuendoes, provocative and inciting articles any time his head appears saturated, congested or overburdened! Here is a man who deliberately set out to insult, disgrace and bring the character of the President to ridicule before the eyes of the World is there in Nigeria still doling out falsehood and innuendoes and nobody is doiing anything about the despicable act against/ about the President of Nigeria! The World is still watching, folks!