Senate bemoans poor state of govt-owned hospitals

Nigerian Senate Chambers
Nigerian Senate Chambers used to illustrate the story.

The need to revitalise Federal Government-owned hospitals on Tuesday caught the attention of the Senate as the lawmakers charged the Finance Ministry to prioritise release of funds to the Ministry of Health.

This followed a motion sponsored by Monsurat Sumonu, Oyo-APC, which seeks to improve the condition of Federal Government-owned hospitals across the country.

Presenting the motion, Mrs. Sumonu, noted that despite Nigeria’s strategic position in Africa, the country’s health sector is greatly under-sized due to inadequate health facilities and incessant strikes by health workers.

She observed that despite a N308, 464, 276.782 allocation to the sector in the 2017 budget, government-owned hospitals are unable to provide basic medicine while medical equipment malfunction due to lack of electricity.

She said that “renovation or even constructions (of government-owned hospitals) are baseless if hospitals are not well-equipped with basic facilities to save lives.”

Speaking on the motion, Ali Wakili, Bauchi-APC, said the country cannot fight poverty with an inadequate health sector.

He charged other Senators to ensure the implementation of the law mandating allocation of one percent of the budget to the health sector.

“We have passed a law that one percent of the budget should be designated to the health care system but unfortunately, implementation has been poor,” he said.

“Every senator should ensure that the law we passed and was assented to by the executive is properly implemented.”

Adopting four resolutions, the Senate charged the Ministries of Finance and Budget to prioritise the Ministry of Health in the release of annual budgetary allocation.

The lawmakers also charged the Ministry of Health to ensure efficiency in the health care services, and to maintain high standard of health care delivery services in the country through periodic training and hospital inspection.

The Senate in other resolutions charged its committee on Health to probe government-owned hospitals and urged the hospitals to provide quality management through continuous evaluation.


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  • Ismail Babatunde Sowunmi

    Am not surprise, non of them is using government facilities.

  • Okokondem

    If only the ‘honorable’ senators would consider cutting back on the outrageous salaries and unholy ‘security allowances’ they collect to make more resources available for Healthcare and other critical needs.

    I commend the lady, Sen. Sumonu, for introducing the bill. However, I am puzzled why she is just realizing the sorry state of the country’s health facilities which is the reason all of them seek Healthcare overseas. I’m also surprised she blames the poor conditions on occasional strike by health workers contesting poor working conditions and inadequate salaries.

    By the way, is that budget 308 million or billion naira, I am confused by the placement of the decimal point?

  • thusspokez

    She observed that despite a N308, 464, 276.782 allocation to the sector in the 2017 budget, government-owned hospitals are unable to provide basic medicine while medical equipment malfunction due to lack of electricity.

    And the legislators’ ingenious solution is:

    “We have passed a law that one percent of the budget should be designated to the health care system but unfortunately, implementation has been poor,” he [Ali Wakili] said.

    Fast forward to a few years from now and we will again read:

    “…despite one percent of the budget allocation to the sector… government-owned hospitals are unable to provide basic medicine…

    With such ingenious problem solvers, one wonders why their solutions never work.