2 Nigerian soldiers injured in clash with Delta youth – Official

The Nigerian Navy said on Monday that two of its officers were injured in a skirmish between its officers and youth of Ode-Ugborodo community in Warri South-West Area of Delta State.

The Commander of the Nigerian Navy Ship, Delta, Musa Gemu, confirmed the incident to journalists at a naval base in Warri.

Mr. Gemu, a Captain, however, declined to give further details about the attack, promising to issue a statement at the “appropriate time.’’

Femi Uwaway, a member of Ugborodo Export Processing Zone (EPZ) Interface Committee, also confirmed the incident, but called it a little skirmish.

He said he could not ascertain whether people were injured in the skirmish.

Also contacted, Austin Oborogbeyi, the Chairman of EPZ Committee, declined comment on the incident.

The incident occurred barely four days after a reported military action in the community to restore peace and resettle persons displaced by a recent crisis in the area.

The youth were alleged to have confronted the security personnel at about 2.00 a.m. and ordered them to vacate the community.

(NAN)


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  • redeem

    they are supposed to be fighting in the north and not attack civilians in the niger delta—-time for the soldiers of occupation to leave the SS FOR THE FULANI NORTH

  • AntiCorruCrusaders

    IMPLEMENT THE 2014 NATIONAL CONFERENCE RESOLUTIONS OR CONVOKE A NEW ONE TO ALLOW NIGERIANS TO DECIDE.

    THE WRITER IS NEEDLESSLY WORRIED ABOUT POOR STATES. DO WE NOT HAVE 100 MILLION POOR PEOPLE TODAY LIVING IN POOR STATES EVEN AS WE SHARE REVENUES?

    IN A RESTRUCTURED NIGERIA RICH STATES WOULD PAY TAXES AND WHOEVER REMAINS POOR AFTER THAT WOULD DO WHAT POOR PEOPLE ALL OVER THE WORLD.

    THIS ARTICLE SHOULD BE IN THE FRONT PAGE BUT PREMIUMNEWS WOULD PURPOSELY HIDE IT BECAUSE THEY PLAY FOR STATUS QUO.

    • Peter

      True Fiscal Federalism is the answer to our present economic woes where corruption, nepotism and economic vices have replaced the ideals of the genuine aspiration of the people to move forward. Ethnic suspicion and the fear emanating from the north of the country that adopting the resolutions of the National Conference would set their people back is the reason why Buhari will not implement the outcome of that conference. To merely borrow the present presidential system from America but refusing to practice the true fiscal federalism like that country is an injustice. America and Switzerland are successful today because they practice what they preach – CONFEDERATION. It is not as if there are no state within the conferral America or Switzerland that are not poor. The north should stop setting the other areas of the country back because of their perceived fears so that Nigeria can make progress.

  • Lekan latubosun

    “It is not the strongest of the species that
    survives, nor the most intelligent that survives. It is the one that is most
    adaptable to change.” ~ Charles Darwin.

    Evolution
    or change is inevitable. It has to happen. The issue with re-structuring Nigeria
    is a ‘must-happen’ to achieve the country’s great potentials.

    1.
    To think that the Niger Delta will be the richest is too simple analysis. In
    other parts of the country lie resources obvious and not-so-obvious that have more
    revenue potentials than oil.

    2.
    The oil dependence has crippled human imagination in all parts of Nigeria.
    Human imagination however is the greatest resource.

    3.
    Osun state is a small-below-optimum entity that should not be a singular entity
    under an efficient structure. Possibly a small part of SW state. In that way,
    there will be a lean yet efficient civil service driving private-led economic
    development.

    If
    we choose to maintain the status quo, we will continue to have this political
    and social turbulence: unrest, continuing radicalizations and attendant
    violence, youth restiveness in the Delta, unpaid salaries each cycle of low oil
    revenues, dwindling standards of living among Nigerians, terrible income
    distribution with a continuously widening chasm between the haves and
    have-nots. I don’t think this is the lot we should choose.

    Finally,
    we need to fashion out a new constitution and retire this current crappy
    document we call a constitution which they have sworn to defend unfortunately.
    The people across the country need to understand the disadvantage of our
    current course. We only need to get the voice out and the waves will eventually
    move. It’s about time!

    Change comes from without at first, then from within.

    CHINA.
    We were all witnesses of the events at Tiananmen square where the chinese
    people made their voice heard. (Without). The communist party was compelled to
    reform appropriately. (Within). We
    know that those events have culminated in China’s unprecedented prosperity.

    SOUTH
    AFRICA. The struggles of the black communities (Without) made the Nationalist
    Party (Within) to back down from it supremacist stance. SA is now a free,
    prospering democracy with their corporations conquering on all fronts across
    the African continent.

    SOVIET
    UNION and recently UNITED KINGDOM. Who would think that the UK would go
    federalist? Yet they are rapidly on that path. The UK is far more homogenous
    than Nigeria. The more reason why babel-like heterogeneous Nigeria must be
    federalist. A non-federalist Nigeria will never prosper. Never! It is an
    absolute impossibility.

    That
    is the CHANGE I know and hope for – truly Federal Republic of Nigeria.

    Let me respond to specific questions raised in your
    article, Tony Osborg.

    1.
    Many states are not ripe for economic competition as they have no source of
    alternative income (apart from federal allocations) and the substructure to
    build an economy upon;
    how do we fix this problem?

    First,
    we made the error of shearing up Nigeria into 36 shreds. Now we kept on that
    process until we came overboard into the negative side of economic viability.
    You must very well understand the principle of Break Even Points where the
    expenditures do not exceed the revenues. But beyond this point, the entity is
    not sustainable. And you must understand also, that Economics of Scale plays an
    important part in this balance. Summarily, most Nigerian states have been
    shredded below their optimal point. Size is key.

    Solution:
    Re-merge contiguous and sufficiently culturally and linguistically homogenous
    states into one.

    2.
    There are alternative sources of income lying fallow in many states. For
    example, I remember some years back when about 400 people died somewhere in
    Igbeti, Oyo state, illegally mining marble deposits (most of them togolese).
    And so there are many such deposits in idle states or illegal exploitation upon
    which state governments could base their newfound economies in a federalist
    structure.

    3.
    Many of these states however have an ebullient informal economy. People are
    making billions from trading, felling trees, selling cocoa, planting oil palms,
    but there is no tax structure in place to run a lean and purposeful government.

    Second question, how do we ensure that a restructured
    Nigeria will be fair to all regions/states and economic justice will be
    guaranteed even to the least advantaged regions/states? How can states that
    currently cannot afford to pay workers cope when they
    are cut short of crude oil allocations? They obviously will go bankrupt!

    1.
    Like I said before, 36 miniature states cannot sustain 36 Governors,
    Legislature, Judiciary and Civil Service and still expect to have funds for
    development or even pay workers. There’s so much waste designed into the
    system. Wealthy Germany has 16 Landers or states, wealthy and wide Canada has
    only 10 Provinces. And they are federalist even though much more homogenous
    than Nigeria. Merging states is the first step to paying workers salaries
    consistently.

    2.
    The real injustice that is going on is robbing Ifeanyi to pay Rauf. You cannot
    keep sustaining the economy of Osun state by taking Delta’s wealth from her.
    The Niger Deltan validly had an entitlement mentality therefore that Goodluck
    Jonathan ought to continue as President whether he was performing or not. The
    Niger Delta’s restiveness is justified. The Nigerian state agrees, hence all
    the interventionist policies like NDDC, Ministry of Niger Delta, and Amnesty
    Program. Yet all this suffices not. What suffices is Resource Control, and the
    Federal Government monitors revenues and collects dues and taxes as
    appropriate. The FG may now intervene in states where apparently there’s crisis
    with funds at its own disposal. That’s justice. The FG may then prevail upon
    wealthier states to assist an ailing state if need be, that’s brotherhood.

    Third, even if there is initial financial provisions for
    ‘poor’ states to kickstart their independent economies after the restructuring
    process, there is still no guarantee that these independent economies will be
    sustainable on the long run, considering
    their present level of Internally Generated Revenues. The recurrent costs of
    the civil service of many of these states alone consume more than what states
    generate internally, hence can such states survive the initial troubles that
    would come with the proposed restructuring? How do we control this impact?

    The
    beauty of Nigeria is that there’s no part of it that’s not self sustaining by
    Nature’s design. There’s no barren desert.

    The
    governments have to be run in an efficient business-like sustainable, bottom-up
    fashion to keep this self-sustenance.

    What
    do I mean? The fedralist structure I propose does not stop at the level of the
    states. But rather, starting at the LGs, the agglomeration of commuities must
    have a localised economy that is self sustaining to the LG, autonomous of the
    State Government i.e. Resource Control starts at the Local Govt level and this
    feeds into the states and thus into the FG – that’s bottom up. This way,
    governments cannot but be efficient. How does the LG control its resources, the
    families and communities who own the lands are automatic stakeholders. We scrap
    that slavery called Land Use Decree.

    With
    this kind of community-private enterprise-government partnership will release
    potentials on all fronts in Nigeria. The North of Nigeria alone may be feeding
    the whole of Africa. Sustainability is the least of Nigeria’s worries in a
    federalist structure.

    -Lekan Latubosun

    Federalists’ Movement of Nigeria

  • Ojodume Okuguni

    It’s either Nigeria restructures or it self-destructs. The latter option is usually violent and uncontrollably destructive and should therefore be avoided.
    Some people worry about the viability of some states when fiscal federalism is entrenched. Those people are overlooking a number of facts; (a) there’s hardly any state in Nigeria without developable natural resources,
    (b) since the realities that necessitated the creation of the states have changed they necessarily have to be “uncreated” through mergers on mutually acceptable terms.
    We need to make hard choices in the face of current realities and avoid self-destruction.
    All we need to own together as Nigeria are the Naira, a restructured Military, a restructured National Assembly, Foreign Affairs Ministry, the Super Eagles and few other institutions which would require the collaboration of the federating units for them to be viable and competitive.