Boko Haram: 1,500 women give birth in displaced persons’ camps

No fewer than 1,500 women gave birth in 28 Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) camps in Borno in 2015, the State Primary Health Care Management Board said on Sunday in Maiduguri.

The Executive Secretary of the Board, Sule Mene, told the News Agency of Nigeria that the deliveries were recorded between January 2015 and January 2016.

The women are part of the hundreds of thousands of people displaced by the Boko Haram insurgency in Northern Nigeria. About 20,000 people have also been killed.

Mr. Mene said about 14,600 pregnant women received anti-natal health care, psycho-social services and child nutrition support.

He said that the agency had also received about 1,200 severe medical cases, which were referred to the University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital (UMTH) for proper care.

The official said the agency had established 20 Integrated Primary Health Care Centres for IDPs in all the camps to provide healthcare and referral services.

“The Borno Government has procured health kits for each of the IDPs to help cater for their immediate needs.

“We have equally distributed mosquito nets to each and every one of them,” he said.

According to him, the agency, in collaboration with Federal Road Safety Commission, had trained its drivers to ensure prompt response to expectant mothers to access health facilities.

Mr. Mene also said no fewer than 190,000 IDPs in 28 camps in the state had benefitted from its free medical outreach.

He said that 10,800 children aged zero to five were enrolled for management of varying degrees of malnutrition, while about 121,000 were given various immunisation antigen.

He explained that the agency had inaugurated about 240 Integrated Primary Health Care Teams (IPHCT) that would ensure availability of the relevant services to meet the demands of IDPs in camps.

According to him, 14 health officials posted in each of the camps would provide health care services like routine immunisation against preventable diseases for children aged zero to 11 months.

He said that the gesture was to enhance healthy growth of the children in the area of nutrition as well as malaria and tuberculosis prevention.

Mr. Mene listed other services enjoyed by the IDPs to include anti-natal health care to pregnant women, psycho-social services as well as child nutrition support for mothers.

He said the board, through its Community Management of Malnutrition Team (CMMT), had ensured frequent provision of clean and potable water in the camps.

According to him, the team was set up by the agency’s department of disease and control.

The executive secretary mentioned some of the challenges faced by the agency to include increasing number of IDPs coming to the camps on a daily basis from the liberated towns.

He regretted that the camps were over-stretched, but that the agency was working with partners like NEMA, WHO, UNDP, Doctors without Borders and UNICEF, among others, to provide conducive, healthy and hygienic environment for the displaced persons.

(NAN)


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  • Otile

    So the Northerners have converted those IDPs to baby factories. Utangirma Allalh.

    • IS.JESUS.CHRIST.A.CHRISTIAN

      THE LADIES WERE IMPREGNATED BY THEIR LEGALLY MARRIED HUSBANDS WHO WERE EITHER KILLED BY BOKO HARAM OR ABDUCTED OR DECLARED MISSING.

      • Otile

        How do you that? Do you live with them?

        • IS.JESUS.CHRIST.A.CHRISTIAN

          I HAVE VISITED YOLA IDP CAMPS MAIDUGURI IDP CAMPS DAMATURU IDP CAMPS AND SOME OF BAUCHI AND TARABA’S CAMPS AS WELL.

          • Otile

            Don’t say IDP camps, say baby factories. That’s what they are.

          • IS.JESUS.CHRIST.A.CHRISTIAN

            BABY FACTORIES ARE USUALLY AN IGBO AFFAIR. YOU CANNOT SITE BABY FACTORIES OUT OF SOUTH EAST NIGERIA. IMPOSSIBLE!

          • Otile

            Look who’s talking. Are you blind to see what is happening in the camps near you? Everywhere you turn in the North you are greeted with baby factories daga IDPs cikin Sambisa evil forest. Wallahi.

          • IS.JESUS.CHRIST.A.CHRISTIAN

            JUST SEARCH THE INTERNET AND SEE HOW BABY FACTORIES ARE FLOURISHING IN SOUTH EAST NIGERIA AMONG THE IGBOS. BFP!

          • Otile

            Show of one of such place. Forget al-Taqiyya, nobody believes you.

          • IS.JESUS.CHRIST.A.CHRISTIAN

            Nigeria Army Busts Baby Factory In Enugu

            Soldiers from the 82nd Division of the Nigerian Army busted a notorious “baby factory” in the Gariki area of Enugu, the capital of Enugu State, last weekend.

            by SAHARAREPORTERS, NEW YORK

            Aug 26, 2015

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            Soldiers from the 82nd Division of the Nigerian Army busted a notorious “baby factory” in the Gariki area of Enugu, the capital of Enugu State, last weekend. The factory posed as a hospital, one of our sources said.

            Some of the victims freed in army raid

            A military source told SaharaReporters that a unit of soldiers were sent to the location of the factory after one of the victims had tipped off the army. The young woman who reportedly exposed the “baby factory” had managed to escape from the breeding house in the city. Our source disclosed that the army raided the clinic and found at least ten pregnant women held against their will as they awaited childbirth. According to the source, after the women delivered, the babies were taken from them by the operators of the baby factory and sold.

            The escaped victim said she had been introduced to a woman identified as a “nurse” and who was to help her deliver her baby. A month later, she delivered a baby. As soon as she was able to stand up, she was asked to go and take a shower. But on returning to the delivery room, she found to her horror that her newborn baby had disappeared.

            She stated that the nurse running the baby factory offered her N120,000 and told her that her baby had been given to those who could not biologically have babies.

            After arresting the operator of the factory, Chinyere Nome, the soldiers handed her over to the National Agency for the Prohibition of Trafficking in Persons (NAPTIP).

            SaharaReporters learned that the army unit that raided the hospital that served as the factory saw and rescued 10 women locked up inside a high-rise fenced compound in Gariki, Enugu. The victims reported that nobody who came into the facility ever left without delivering her baby. “Any girl who came in would not be allowed to go outside again until after delivery,” one victim said.

            A source told SaharaReporters that the soldiers from 82 Division arrived at the compound around 8 a.m., using as a decoy a young woman who pretended to be pregnant and looking for a nurse to abort the pregnancy. When the operator of the baby factory answered the door, she was rushed by soldiers hiding inside a tinted bus. Our correspondent learned that the soldiers drew their weapons as they stormed out of their parked bus.

            After gaining entry into the heavily secured facility, the soldiers found a mini-clinic and several young women at various stages of pregnancy.

            Three of the women were within five days of delivery at the time of the rescue.

            A source said the operator of the factory sold each baby for between N300,000 and N400,000.

          • Otile

            Jihadi, don’t make up stories in line with al-Taqiyya. We are not interested in your islamic fairy tale.

          • IS.JESUS.CHRIST.A.CHRISTIAN

            PROUD TO BE JIHADI IN ITS REAL ISLAMIC MEANING AND I AM HAPPY FOR SO. BASTARRD BABY FACTORY PRODUCT. IMBECILE

          • IS.JESUS.CHRIST.A.CHRISTIAN

            Governor

            April 11, 2014 1

            Ogun-State-Governor-Ibikunle-Amosun-360×225 (1) 

            The Ogun State Government, yesterday, initiated moves to reconcile victims of the Akute baby-making factory with their families, just as two babies delivered after their mothers were rescued have been named after Governor Ibikunle Amosun. The state Ministry of Women Affairs and Social Development is interfacing with Abia, Imo and …
            Read More »

            Police Uncover Baby Factory In Asaba

            April 5, 2014 0

            police 

            A baby factory has been smashed at the outskirts of Asaba, Delta State by the police. A 40-year-old woman who runs the factory was also arrested. State Police Public Relations Officer, PPRO, Celestina Kalu, while conducting newsmen around the sealed factory yesterday said; “Today, (4/4/14) at about 1030 hours, the …

          • IS.JESUS.CHRIST.A.CHRISTIAN

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            Nigerian Teen Girls Rescued From Clinic Accused Of Selling Babies After Raid of baby factories in eastern Nigeria.

             06/02/2011 02:54 pm ET | Updated Aug 02, 2011

            Associated Press

            YINKA IBUKUN

            LAGOS, Nigeria — Dozens of pregnant teenagers could face charges after being accused of planning to sell their babies into a growing child trafficking trade in Nigeria’s southeast, officials said Thursday.

            Thirty-two girls between 15 and 18 years old were arrested during the raid of an illegal clinic in Aba in Abia state Saturday, the state police chief said. Police believe the children were destined to be trafficked in Africa’s most populous country.

            The girls were taken at the Cross Foundation, locally known as Heda Clinic. The clinic’s director was also arrested. The police accused him of buying the babies from the young mothers and selling them for a generous profit to childless couples. He denied the charge, and said he is a volunteer doctor who delivers the unwanted babies and then places them in orphanages.

            “One of the girls told us that mothers sell their babies for $160 to $190,” said Abia State police chief Bala Hassan.

            Anti-trafficking agency spokesman Orakwe says that they can then be resold for up to $6,400, depending on their gender. Traditionally, boys are preferred, as they can inherit land according to the local Igbo culture.

            Abortion is illegal in Nigeria, and its southeast region is mostly Catholic.

            “This girl already feels that she has brought a burden onto her family and onto herself, and she wants to get it over with,” says Orakwe.

            Child trafficking carries a penalty of 14 years to life imprisonment.

            The girls were first taken to a police station, and then to a shelter in the city of Enugu run by the anti-trafficking agency for interrogation.

            Authorities said they suspect most of the girls were impregnated by boyfriends, but said they are also investigating the possibility that some were forced or tricked into having babies.

            “There is an increasing market,” says Orakwe. “We found out that some homes get a person to impregnate a girl, take away their supposed burden and then give them peanuts.”

            The anti-trafficking agency said the problem is most pronounced in Nigeria’s southeast, where people prey on girls to provide babies for trafficking rings. The absence of paperwork for these children means anything can happen to them. An illegal adoption home was shut down in the area on Monday.

            Concerned about a trend it says is growing, the anti-trafficking agency is planning a meeting with all government bodies dealing with trafficking issues, including Nigerian immigration and the Ministry of Women Affairs, to find ways to improve oversight.

            “We are also calling on parents to find better ways to deal with this issue rather than stigmatize these young girls,” says Orakwe. “These things happen. So long as the stigma is there, people will run from their homes.”

            MORE:
            Women’s Rights, Pregnancy, Nigeria, Human Trafficking, Nigeria Baby Factory, Selling Babies, Pregnant Teenagers, Nigeria Human Trafficking

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          • IS.JESUS.CHRIST.A.CHRISTIAN

            Exposed: Nigeria’s Notorious Baby Factories

            The government of Africa’s most populous country is trying to crack down on this hideous trade, which may include the sale of children for use in rituals.

            ENUGU, Nigeria — Eze, as we’ll call him, is an agent involved in Nigeria’s notorious baby trafficking ring. In a local restaurant in Nigeria’s southeastern city of Enugu, where dozens of people gather every evening to eat the city’s popular goat-meat pepper soup, and where all kinds of gossip can be heard, I overheard him talking to a middle-aged woman about the possibility of getting her a newborn child of any sex she requires.

            I walked up to him after the woman had left, and sought to find out if he truly sells babies.

            “Do you want a baby fresh from the womb?” he asked me.

            He thought I wanted to buy a baby, but in fact I was on a fact-finding mission.

            Eze claimed to be able to get me babies in less than 24 hours. He said that a baby, due to be born in a couple of days, was meant to go to a couple in Sweden but could be mine if I paid the cash in full immediately.

            “We’ll get another baby for this couple. They won’t even notice we’ve given them something else,” he said.

            I then told Eze I wanted to be taken to the factory, to be sure if the business was genuine before saying anything.

            “It wouldn’t work that way,” he said to me. “For security reasons, the women are kept in a hidden place. We don’t want any encounter with the police.”

            When I insisted I needed to see the babies before believing him, Eze said he could only take me to the woman who runs the factory, but with a condition that I paid him 10,000 naira (about $50).

            I was eager to find out how this trade was carried out, so I paid the money, and off we went—driving for about 20 minutes in a cab through slum neighborhoods late at night.

            Eze may be the agent for the business, but he isn’t very familiar with the area where his employer lives. On the two occasions he’s been there, it was under the cover of darkness, he said. He told me his boss deliberately took him to her home at night so he would not recognize the location of the place. That suggests some of the secrecy that shrouds this business.

            On the last part of the trip we were guided by a young boy who knew the woman we were looking for. He soon pointed at a gate, saying, simply, “It’s here.”

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            We met Eze’s “Madam,” a middle-aged woman who introduces herself as “Madam Sarah” and asks us to follow her to the sitting room. She bid us have a seat and then turned to me. “Welcome, my son,” she said.

            “I have about six girls in my custody, and they are all heavily pregnant and expecting soon,” she said. “They are not here. I keep them in a secret location.”

            As we were talking, a young man walked in and whispered to her. After he had left, Madam Sarah turned to me and said: “That man is the biological father to many of the children we sell,” apparently to convince me that the babies she sells are not stolen.

            “His job is to get the girls pregnant, and he knows how to get the job done,” she said with a big smile.

            She went on to tell me that she charges 400,000 naira ($2,000) for a girl and 500,000 naira ($2,500) for a boy.

            She talked about the cost of caring for the mothers, justifying the price of the babies. “It’s expensive catering for these girls,” she said. “I give them food and shelter and pay the guys who sleep with them, but I let them go after they have given birth.”

            She claims she can arrange court orders and is able to get children of all ages, genders and complexions, and at any time. The police, she said, are not a problem for her.

            “What sex do you want?” she asked me. “A boy or a girl?”

            “He just came to find out if what I told him about this business was true,” Eze told her. She then turned to me and said: “Now you know it’s real. Come back when you’re ready.”

            I stood up and left, winding my way back to the waiting taxi, having glimpsed up close how the child trade mafia operates in Africa’s most populous country.

            Every year, the Nigerian security operatives discover several new baby factories. Young girls are held captive to give birth to babies who are then sold illegally either to adoptive parents, into slavery, or, it is said, for traditional rituals. There are rumors and fears that newborns are being sold to witch doctors for rituals in a country where there is a widespread belief in traditional communities that a powder made of infants brings luck. But, such sensational claims notwithstanding, the vast majority of buyers almost certainly are married couples struggling to conceive.

            A huge amount of the trade is carried out locally in Nigeria, but authorities suspect that babies also have been sold to people from Europe and the United States, and despite the controversy surrounding adoptions in Nigeria, many foreigners continue to seek infants here.

            There are several reasons given for the high patronage of baby factories.

            Security agencies say most places where the illegal baby trade occurs masquerade as non-governmental organizations or charitable homes for marginalized women. Operators of these places present themselves as humanitarians who take care of the pregnant teenagers in need.

            Human trafficking, including selling children, is prohibited under Nigerian law (PDF), but almost 10 years ago a UNESCO report (PDF) on human trafficking in Nigeria identified the business as the country’s third-most common crime behind financial fraud and drug trafficking, and the situation certainly has not improved. At least 10 children are reportedly sold every day across the country.

            The scourge has intensified in the southeast, which is populated mainly by the Igbo ethnic group. Security officials have several ongoing undercover operations targeting suspected baby trafficking rings in Enugu State, underscoring the severity of the problem in this region.

            One measure taken by the government to check the proliferation of baby factories in the state has been to set up a committee on child adoption, and its research has suggested that the incidence of child trafficking and illegal adoptions has been on the rise because some security agencies and unscrupulous state officials aided the baby-sellers.

            “They are now being sold like commodities and, as a responsible government, we cannot allow this to continue to exist in Enugu State,” Ifeanyi Ugwuanyi, governor of Enugu, said while inaugurating the committee last month.

            “While we acknowledge the right and the necessity for the childless or benevolent couples to adopt motherless children and orphans,” the governor declared, “we believe that there is need for strict compliance with due process and the provisions of relevant laws to guarantee the security and well being of the affected children.”

            Eze and Madam Sarah, of course, have other ideas.

          • IS.JESUS.CHRIST.A.CHRISTIAN

            Inside Nigeria’s Baby Factories

            Therese Cristiansson talks to pregant teenager. Photo: Expressen | Terese Cristiansson
            Therese Cristiansson talks to pregant teenager. Photo: Expressen | Terese Cristiansson

            Source: Expressen | Terese Cristiansson

            Baby factories in Nigeria are pumping out babies for sale on the illegal adoption market. Swedish journalist Therese Cristiansson infiltrated these baby-trafficking networks with a hidden camera.

            “Do you want the baby with or without the placenta?”

            The woman who calls herself “Mama” looks at us and clairifies whether we wanta “fresh” baby.

            We meet her in the dark and simple office of her half-burned baby factory.

            She thinks we want to buy a baby, but in fact we are carrying a hidden camera.

            Every year, the Nigerian police discover several new baby factories. Women are held captive to give birth to babies destined to be sold illegally either toadoptive parents, rituals, or slavery.

            Large parts of the trade areconducted locally in Nigeria, but the police suspect that children also have been sold to Europe and the USA.

            Hidden camera

            Nevertheless, many countries continue to adopt children from Nigeria. Since 2008, at least 78 Nigerian adoptions have occurred in Sweden, according to statistics from Adoptionscentrum. These children have special needs and are most probably not from the baby factories, but the phenomenon is well known. International adoption agencies claim that the children, their parents and the entire adoption process is overseen by the Nigerian government. But in Nigeria there are no such guaranties.

            Today, in an exclusive story, Expressen reveals how the baby-trafficking from Nigeria works.

            With a hidden camera, we have infiltrated several of the baby factories in southern Nigeria. To get access to the factories, we claimed to be interested in buying a child and that we wanted to meet the pregnant women in order to choose the mother of our baby, and also that we were from an organization calledHome of Hope that wanted to have future business relations with the baby factories.

            It takes us just three days to establish contact with several agents that are part of the baby trafficking networks. They claim to be able to get us babies by the following day. One of the agents mentions that an infant, due to be born in a couple of days, is meant to go to a couple in Spain but could be ours since we are on location.

            “They won’t notice if they get another baby,” says Frank, the agent that we meet in the city of Umuahia.

            “Do you want a girl or a boy? Twins perhaps?”

            We say that we want to go to the factories, see the women, and then decide if we want to go through with the deal.

            “Oh, that is hard. There has been a lot of trouble with the police and the women are hidden. But we give them food, shelter and sleep with them so they keep calm. I’m a father to many of the sold children, haha. But I’m going to try to solve this.”

            The next day we meet up with another agent in the city of Aba. She knows of many baby factories and immediately gives us the addresses.

            The first baby factory we visit is situated in a small village, an hour outside of Aba. It’s hot and we’re nervous. We are on our way to meet people who are willing to sell children for money, in other words hardened criminals. We are worried that they are going to discover the hidden camera or not believe our cover-story aboutHome of Hope. We have already decided it is worth the risk. The tall gate is locked when we arrive. We park the car close to the wall to ensure an escape route if we are caught. Finally a guard opens the gate. Almost all buildings are burnt to the ground and two Volvos have been scrapped in the yard. Over the car doors small children’s shirts are hung to dry. Behind one of the burnt down walls we can spot a couple of mattresses and a fire with a pot hanging over it. A couple of minutes later we see the first pregnant woman. After a short period of time we have counted five pregnant women pacing back and forth.

            An older woman enters through the gate. She introduces herself as “Mama” and asks us to follow her to the office. We explain our business. She lights up when we start talking business and dollars.

            4000 for a girl, 4400 for a boy

            “I have five women here but 35 in another house in Umuahia. You can go there and see. But we have to talk to my son ’cause we run this together,” she says.

            She tells us that she charges 4000 dollar for a girl and 4400 dollar for a boy.

            “I give the girls food and shelter and help them with their physical exams. The same day they give birth they go away, she says.”

            She claims to be able to get children of all ages and genders and at any time. She can also arrange court orders and deal with the police.

            “I delivered three babies yesterday and they have already been picked up by Nigerians.”

            At this point she looks at us and asks:

            “Do you want the baby with or without the placenta?”

            We quickly gather ourselves and ask if there is a price difference, but no, there isn’t. She states that we will have a “fresh” baby, not older than 24 hours.

            She brings us back to the burnt down buildings, to meet the five pregnant women living there.

            “As you can see it’s all burnt down. The cops came and burnt it all. They cause a lot of problems nowadays. That is why I hide the other 35 women at another place. It is safer.”

            In the yard we get the chance to talk to two women, 28 and 21 years old, both in their last stages of pregnancy. They say they have become pregnant by mistake and that they cannotlive at home. They hide during their pregnancy and then return home as soon as they can. When we ask if they want to give their babies for adoption, they answer:

            “You handle the business with Mama.”

            “I want my child to have a good life”

            We end the visit by telling “Mama” that we want to visit the 35 girls. She agrees to try to set this up.

            As we leave the place our Nigerian phone rings. It’s one of the women. She whispers and asks me not to tell “Mama” that she called.

            “I want you to adopt my baby. If it is handled by “Mama” I don’t know what will happen. I want my child to have a good life.”

            She also says that she most of all wants to keep her baby, but that she cannot afford it.

            We answer that we have to think about it.

            The next day we contact yet another baby factory in Aba. To get there we have to walk through simple, poor neighbourhoods. We are guided by a woman who knows the owners of the baby factory. She walks quickly. We are sweating and the walk worries us. If they expose us, we’ll have a long way back to the car. But we continue and soon the woman points at a gate with a large sign saying “Apostolic church”. We wonder if we understood her right, but the agent knocks on the jade metal door.

            The door is opened by a young man who welcomes us and introduces us to his mother, Love, and his father, Bro Nkem. They run the baby factory.

            The first thing we see when we get inside the compound is a couple of pregnant women, several small children and a woman who has just given birthwith her newborn babyin her arms. Rusty cribs stand along the walls. Above one of the rooms hangs a sign saying ”favour” and inside the door we see an examining table. Love says that she delivers the babies there.

            We visit their place twice and the couple are very interested in Home of Hope, they see great potential to make large amounts of money. They tell us exactly how they work.

            “We can get any amount of babies. If you need two tomorrow, we simply get it,” says Bro.

            “We have had other international couples buying babies, both from England and USA. They paid 1.2 million naira (7 500 USD) for a boy,” he continues.

            “How much for a girl?” we ask.

            “800,000 naira (5 050 USD),” Love answers.

            They mention that they have had problems with the police and that Love has been arrested a lot. But she is always released.

            “If they come here we give them 300,000 naira (1 900 USD) and the problem goes away, Bro says.

            They also say that they have all the documentation from the social security administration. They show us diplomas and documents that appear to show their work is legitimate. All of it is bought.

            “The court is no problem, don’t worry. We’ll handle it,” Bro says.

            “You have a church, could that become a problem to Home of Hope?”

            “No, that is just for security. If the military come we simply say that we have a church and that we are helping those in need. Sometimes some delegates from Germany come here and give us money.”

            “What happens if the girls wants their babies back?”

            “It won’t happen. We take care of the girls. Don’t worry,” Love says.

            Cash and carry business

            She looks at us sternly and says:

            “We run a “cash and carry” business. The girls never see the babies.”

            “If a girl is strong, can she get pregnant more than once?” I ask.

            “Yes, no problem.”

            They start talking about the babies as if it is a market.

            “You can decide if you want a tall, short, smart mother. Do you want the babies to have dark or light skin?’

            We repeat that we want to see the women, not the babies. Finally they lead us to the back of the house.

            We walk down a long corridor. We hear infants crying.

            “This is the old part of the business, but we are growing. More and more people want to buy children,” says Bro.

            The corridor opens onto a small courtyard with an unfinished building at the back. At least 10 pregnant women sit, stand and lie around. There are worn and dirty mattresses on the floor. Bro points out two women who are close to giving birth. He says the women are forbidden from leaving the house because then they risk exposing the baby factory.

            “We can have at least 10 women here but we could expand if demands increase,” he emphasizes.

            A young girl who barely lifts her head stands behind the other women. We can’t bear it and ask if she is all right. She looks at us and strokes her stomach. With a low voice she answers that she is OK. Her body language speaks otherwise: grief.

            “She gave birth yesterday, the child is gone but we do not talk to her about it. Now she must leave,” says Bro.

            Used in rituals

            Besides selling babies to childless couples, there are some indications that sold children are used in rituals. In some parts of Nigeria it is still believed that a powder made of infants brings luck.

            “How do you know that the sold children aren’t used in rituals?” we ask when leaving the women.

            “We don’t, we do not ask any questions,” Bro says.

            Mama, Bro, Love and all the agents we encounter say that the women in their factories are there by their own free will: that they have gotten pregnant by mistake and can’t return home. They protect them by giving them food and shelter until they can return to their parents.

            But at the police station in the city of Owerri another side of the story emerges.

            Inspector Katsina informs us that they have discovered several factories in which the women have been forced to become pregnant more than once. Others wanted to keep their baby but were then told that it was dead.

            “We have recently saved 106 children. We are trying to locate the mothers but it is time-consuming and difficult,” he says.

            In the background six women are brought into his office. All carry infants.

            “All these persons are suspected for childtrafficking. We are trying to find the mothers but at the moment the children have to stay in the prison with the women,” Katsina continues.

            He is angry.

            “They are Satan. It is a completely horrible business that started as homes for women who needed help, and has now been taken over by criminals who just want to make money. At the moment we are investigating several cases,” he says.

            New cell-phone as compensation

            Two men and one woman in handcuffs are brought in. A young woman stands in front of them and speaks.

            “When I got pregnant I went to my father who is a pastor. At first he demanded an abortion but I refused. He then took me to a doctor in Port Harcourt,” says Chamaka, 17, and points at one of the men.

            “I had to be there until my baby was delivered. The next day the doctor came and snatched the baby out of my arms. Then he gave the baby to that woman over there, she took off in a red car with my baby,” she says and points at the woman that later is revealed to be a suspect in 18 cases of baby trafficking.

            When Chamaka came home after the delivery, she got a new cell-phone as compensation from her father. She shows us the phone and throws it on the table.

            “I later found out that he had bought it with the money he got for my daughter. I don’t want a phone, I want my child,” Chamaka says holding back tears.

            Katsina looks at the suspects and says that they have a lower standing than the pygmy goats in their village.

            “Selling babies, what kind of person does that? I’m going to find Chamaka’s baby even if it means turning the whole of Nigeria upside-down. If the child has been killed, I will find the one who killed it,” the police chief adds resolutely.

            At the time of going to press he still hadn’t found Chamaka’s baby. But the police had made several raids and had high hopes of reuniting Chamaka with her daughter.

            However, even if he finds the stolen baby, Katsina knows that the cases which reach the police are only the tip of the iceberg.

            “There are many in their situation, we only hear about a few. We have to make sure that women who become pregnant don’t get excommunicated and we have to stop the market demand for babies,” Katsina.

            “But it seems that there are more and more children and that the market demand is increasing,” Katsina says

            Human Trafficking

          • IS.JESUS.CHRIST.A.CHRISTIAN

            Nigeria ‘baby factory’ raided in Imo state

            10 May 2013

            From the section Africa BBC.COM

            map
            Seventeen pregnant teenage girls and 11 babies have been rescued from a house in Nigeria’s south-eastern Imo state, police have said.

            They say they are looking for a woman suspected of planning to sell the babies.

            “The girls claimed they were fed once a day and were not allowed to leave the home,” said spokeswoman Joy Elomoko.

            It is not uncommon for such “baby factories” to be found in south-eastern Nigeria.

            The rescued girls said they had all been made pregnant by a 23-year-old man, who has been arrested, reports the AFP news agency.

            The European Union says Nigeria, along with China, is one of the biggest sources of people trafficked into Europe, where they are often forced into prostitution.

            In 2011, the National Agency for the Prohibition of Trafficking in Persons (Naptip), said their investigations showed that babies are sold for up to $6,400 (£4,200) each.

            Poor, unmarried women face tough choices if they get pregnant in Nigeria, often facing exclusion from society, correspondents say.

            Naptip says desperate teenagers with unplanned pregnancies are sometimes lured to clinics and then forced to turn over their babies.

            The babies can be sold for illegal adoption, used for child labour or prostitution or sometimes killed with their body parts used for ritual purposes.

          • IS.JESUS.CHRIST.A.CHRISTIAN

            Abstract

            Baby factories and baby harvesting are relatively new terms that involve breeding, trafficking, and abuse of infants and their biological mothers. Since it was first described in a United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization report in Nigeria in 2006, several more baby factories have been discovered over the years. Infertile women are noted to be major patrons of these baby factories due to the stigmatization of childless couples in Southern Nigeria and issues around cultural acceptability of surrogacy and adoption. These practices have contributed to the growth in the industry which results in physical, psychological, and sexual violence to the victims. Tackling baby factories will involve a multifaceted approach that includes advocacy and enacting of legislation barring baby factories and infant trafficking and harsh consequences for their patrons. Also, programs to educate young girls on preventing unwanted

          • IS.JESUS.CHRIST.A.CHRISTIAN

            Nigerian media had in different instances reported the operation of baby factory across different states in Nigeria. For instance, in Abia State, teenage girls were recruited to produce babies that will be sold for monies by their principals. The state police command discovered this illegal enterprise and arrested the operation. What is more startling is the fact that some of these unlawful acts are being perpetrated by people who should know better. For instance, a baby factory owned and managed by Mr. Orikara, a medical doctor located at the Nicholas Street, Aba in Abia state was raided by the Nigerian Security and Civil Defence Corps (NSCDC). In a similar vein, the Nigerian Security and Civil Defence Corps (NSCDC) arrested a lab scientist, Mr. Onyemachi John, for operating baby factory in Double Research Clinic and Laboratory at Iheoji Mgboko, Obingwa local government area in the same Aba. At the arrest, he claimed he sells the babies to clients looking to adopt them; however, investigation by the security agents revealed the babies were sold customers and their whereabouts cannot be traced.

            Chioma a 15 year old girl rescued by security agents revealed that because of her age, she had to be operated on and given 15, 000 naira. Investigation by the security agents revealed that the teenagers are paid the sum of N10, 000 and N15, 000 respectively for their baby, while the owners of the baby factories sell the babies at N300, 000 and N400, 000 depending on the gender of the baby. It has been reported that some of the teenagers die during the process of delivery for lack of adequate medical attention. Chioma, one of the owners of the baby factories confessed to the security agent during interrogation that over a period of time, she had sold over 18 babies.

            In another instance, Mrs. Comfort Osu Abu was arrested by the Abia State Police Command for operating baby factory at Umuabuwa village, Osisioma Local Government Area. Before the arrest, she has used her home under the disguise of NGO and recruited teenagers who put to bed while she sold the babies to her customers. Also at the Umukpeyi village in the Isiala Ngwa South Local Government Area, the Abia state police command raided baby factory and rescued 14 pregnant teenagers Mr. Udeviotu Onyeke, the state police public relations officer revealed. Investigation shows the baby factory belonged to Madam Nma a child trafficking syndicate leader in the state Mr. Onyeke said.

            In Enugu state, the police command raided a baby factory and rescued 9 pregnant teenagers. Mr. Onyeke the police spokesperson confirmed. Also in Akwa Ibom state, the Nigeria Security and Civil Defence Corps (NSCDC) discovered and raided a baby factory at the Ikot Akpan-Abia, in the outskirts of Uyo and arrested 18 persons in connection to the baby factory operation. Mr. Pedro Idaba, the state commandant of NSCDC, confirmed and said, investigation revealed that the baby factory operates as a medical clinic where teenagers are kept and young men get them pregnant and their babies sold. Some of the victims made confessional statement at the time of the raid and arrest.

            In Ogun state, a baby factory located at number 9 Sebanjo Crescent, off Fabolude Bus stop, Akute community, Ifo Local Government was discovered by the state police command and 8 pregnant women

            In Anambra state, the State Police Command discovered and raided a baby factory, at storey building located close to Atani Police Station, Atani and rescued 13 pregnant girls, and 5 men whose duty it to pregnant the women. Also in Enugu state, Soldiers from the 82nd Division of the Nigerian Army discovered and raided a baby factory at the Gariki community in Enugu and rescued 10 pregnant women.

            In another incident, in Enugu state, the Enugu State Police Command raided and arrested Mr. Ikechukwu Onoh who operates a baby factory located at Etiti Amankwo Ngwo, 9th mile, Udi Local Government Area and rescued 9 pregnant teenagers. Mr. Ebere Amaraizu, the police spokesman who confirmed the operation said the teenagers rescued are Stella James, 19 years from Ohaozara Ebonyi State, Eze Jennifer, 19 years from Obukpa Nsukka local Government, Enugu state, Ugwu Christabel, 17 years from Aku Igboetiti local Government Enugu state, Happiness Mbaonu, 17 years of Nnewi Anambra state, Ovunna Ifeoma, 20 years from Ezza Ebonyi State.

            Lagos Island Maternity Hospital has been alleged to be the largest baby factory in Nigeria, it is alleged that over 300 babies are given birth to in the hospital are sold out. However, at the time of this report, Arm of Hope Foundation could not verify the truth state of the alleged baby factory in the hospital.

            When Arm of Foundation sought the response of NAPTIP as regards baby factory in Nigeria, Mr. Josiah Emerole, Assistatnt Director public Relation Officer of the agency said. Baby factory is known and is becoming popular Nigeria. His agency in collaboration with security agents has arrested some persons who are involved in the grave violation of human right “baby factory.”

            Arm of Hope is committed to giving hope to the less privileged and vulnerable persons without discrimination of any sort, and as such we are using our voice to entreat the government to seek all necessary means to putting an end to this crime against humanity. We are also appealing that perpetrators of this crime should be openly brought to justice. Beyond putting an end to this crime, we call for the government to direct policies and intervention aimed at improving the lives of women and girls in the country so as to prevent them from being led astray by operators of baby factories. We call for individual Nigerians to discourage this dreadful trend and not tolerate the existence of baby factories that show a serious depreciation of our moral standards. While poverty and greed have helped to pull to pieces our moral hedges we must still find a way to our basic fundamental human rights and that of our neighbour.

          • IS.JESUS.CHRIST.A.CHRISTIAN

            YOURSELF YOU ARE A BASTARRD IGBO BABY FACTORY PRODUCT, ARMED ROBBER, 419ER, INTERNET SCAMMER, DRUG PEDAL, WORLD PRISON CITIZEN, JUDICIAL EXECUTION PATRONS.

          • IS.JESUS.CHRIST.A.CHRISTIAN

            THERE ARE MILLIONS OF FACTS ABOUT THE BABY FACTORIES AND ALL WERE 100% IGBO AFFAIR. SON OF A BABY FACTORY.

          • IS.JESUS.CHRIST.A.CHRISTIAN

            BBSP1

      • Otile

        How do you know that? Do you live with those new mothers?

        • Otile

          How do you know that? Do you live with the new mothers?

          • Igwe

            He is one of the fathers.

          • IS.JESUS.CHRIST.A.CHRISTIAN

            IBABY FACTORY PRODUCT AND IGBO WORLD PRISONS PERMANENT SETTLERS.

          • Otile

            We see copious pictures of babies, underage mothers and baby factories in the North every week. Show us one outside the North. Jihadi.

          • IS.JESUS.CHRIST.A.CHRISTIAN

            SEARCH GOOGLE FOR BABY FACTORIES IN NIGERIA AND SEE WHERE THEY ARE SITUATED. BASTARRD BABY FACTORY PRODUCT. IGBO BORN CRIMINAL.

        • IS.JESUS.CHRIST.A.CHRISTIAN

          WE ARE VOLUNTEERS UNDER A UNITED NATIONS SUPERVISION IN PROVIDING SOME SERVICES AT THE IDP’S CAMPS. I AM CONVERSANT WITH THE SITUATION. WOMEN AND NON MARRIED LADIES WERE OFFERED IN MARRIAGE FOR SERIOUS AND HONEST MEN THAT WANT TO BUILD FAMILY AND HOME.

          • Otile

            UN does not fund any Al-Queda, IS, Boko Haram activities. Tell us another story not al-Taqiyya. Serious and honest horny men my foot.

          • IS.JESUS.CHRIST.A.CHRISTIAN

            UNITED NATIONS, AMERICA AND EUROPE SUPPORTS “BUHARI THE BOKO HARAM” ACCORDING TO YOU INSTEAD OF JONATHAN GOODLUCK A FANATIC CHRISTIAN! BASTARRD BABY FACTORY PRODUCT . BOKO HARAM OF C.A.N ORITSEJIAFOR AND BIAFRA IHEJIRIKA. SLUT OF THE GAY KING OF SADOMY JESUS CHRIST THE EVIL SATAN.

          • Otile

            Jihadi, know ye that UN US and EU do not love Buhari or any Islamist for that matter. They use illiterates like Buhari as pawns. The will always invite Duncee to their land and entice him with usurious loans which benefits nothing to Africans but enreaches the lenders. They know how greedy Duncee is and it never fails. Learn something, Jihadi.

          • IS.JESUS.CHRIST.A.CHRISTIAN

            BASTARRD GAY SLUT OF CHURCH CLERICS. BRITAIN AMERICA OR THE WESTERN WORLD ENTIRELY RESPECT THE NORTHERNERS BECAUSE WHEN THE CARRIED OUT THE COLONIALISM ADVENTURES THEY FOUND THE NORTHERN PART OF NIGERIA AND THE HAUSA FULANI WELL ORGANIZED WITH POLITICAL, ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL STRUCTURES IN A CIVILLIZED MANNER SIMILAR TO WHAT YOU OBTAIN IN TURKEY EGYPT LIBYA MOROCCO AND SPAIN. THEY NEVER RULED THE NORTH AND HAUSA FULANI DIRECTLY. THEY WERE RULED INDIRECTLY. BUT FOR THE SOUTHERN PART WHERE THEY FOUND YOU ANIMALS IN THE JUNGLE WANDERING NAKED THEY RAIDED YOU CAPTURED YOU ENSLAVED YOU AND MADE YOU PEOPLE TO BE FOREVER A FAKE WESTERN MAN AND YOU CAN NEVER BE CIVILLISED. A FAKE CHRISTIAN FAITH OF SADOMY WAS MADE TO ENTICE YOU ANIMALS.

          • Otile

            Jihadi, think well. If your assertions are true why do the Northerners dread Western education? What does Boko Haram mean? Don’t use al_Taqiyya do prove your point.

          • IS.JESUS.CHRIST.A.CHRISTIAN

            I AM PROUD TO BE A JIHADI BUT NOT A TERRORIST OR CRUSADER OR A GAY AND SLUT WIFE FOR THE BASTARRD FLESH-GOD JESUS CHRIST. BFS~!

          • IS.JESUS.CHRIST.A.CHRISTIAN

            BASTARRD YAHWEH

          • Igwe

            Gbao!

          • IS.JESUS.CHRIST.A.CHRISTIAN

            EBOYI SLAVE OF THE WHITE MAN.

  • zygote

    They are displaced, yet, they can’t keep their waste in-check. I think they are enjoying this Boko haram saga. I know however that most of the children will belong to the soldiers, it it called spoils of war.

    • Otile

      It is called baby factory.

  • TAWANDA INCOMMUNICADO

    Wow !! Illiteracy is a disease !! Why is it that these northern men still do not give women who are already stressed from trauma a rest in the IDP camps ? If they make babies in that condition,what chances do such children have ? must we leave everything to “God” ?

    God helps those who help themselves.

    • Igwe

      Be quiet our little friend.
      The north needs to maintain a stable population to hold on to its majority status.
      These babies are future voters that will ensure the seat of power remains in northern hands for the foreseeable future!
      Look at the location of the new capital of the country, Abuja. Do you really think it is in the middle of the country?

      Abuja to Lagos is 746 KM
      Abuja to Enugu is 443 KM
      Abuja to Kaduna is 182 KM
      Abuja to Kano is 343 KM

      • TAWANDA INCOMMUNICADO

        They might just be future Boko-haram,if they do not have a good start in life, have you thought about that ?

  • Fadama

    Inasmuch as the act of recreation is good, the current situation does not not overly permit such in the IDPs. The couples in the various IDPs should temporarily put a stop, pending when conditions permit for proper upbringing of any child to be conceived.

    • Igwe

      WHat are you talking about?
      The current situation is perfect for population growth. We will go so far as to say it is the most effective method to grow a population!
      Think about it. They have nothing else to do to occupy their time besides eating, sh1tting and closing their tent entrance with their own version of “Do Not Disturb” sign on the tent.

      Go look at displaced people around the world.

  • Igwe

    Trust Borno people not to waste time in rebounding (population -wise.)
    Whenever people are in a situation without creature comforts like electricity, TV, internet, or any of the other things man uses to distract himself from his situation……infants magically start showing up!
    Afterall, man no be wood!

    This reminds of a limerick that does not quite apply:

    In the days of old,
    When Men were bold
    and condom was not invented,

    We wrapped out dicks
    With tape that sticks
    and babies were prevented.