Nigeria’s UCH records 15 per cent mortality in 2013 – CMD

University College Hospital, UCH, Ibadan, recently carried out successful open heart surgeries.

“UCH Mortality Statistics is an attempt to present the commonest causes of deaths in our hospital.”

The Chief Medical Director, University College Hospital, UCH, Ibadan, Temitope Alonge, on Thursday said the hospital recorded 15 per cent mortality rate in 2013.

Mr. Alonge, who said this in Ibadan at the launch of a compendium titled: ‘UCH Mortality Statistics’ said the book was the first in the history of teaching hospitals in the country.

He said that the statistics covered the period from August 2013 to July 2014.

Mr. Alonge said that the statistics was published to correct erroneous impression of people that most patients brought to UCH do not come out alive.

“UCH Mortality Statistics is an attempt to present the commonest causes of deaths in our hospital.

“We have tried to use the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) in the compilation and production of the statistics.

“The use of the ICD-10 will help to standardise our data, so it can be comparable internationally,’’ he said.

Mr. Alonge disclosed that the leading cause of death in the period under review was HIV and AIDS, closely followed by injuries sustained from accidents and cancers.

He said that 13 open heart surgeries had been successfully carried out by the hospital with no casualties recorded.

He urged the public to change their past negative belief about high mortal rate recorded in the health institutions, saying it was never the case.

Mr. Alonge, who said the figures would go a long way in changing the public views, solicited the continued assistance of the Federal Government and other stakeholders in the health sector for assistance.

(NAN)


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  • tsunami1earthquake

    Mr Medical Director, in spite of your correction, are you satisfied or happy that the death rate is JUST or ONLY 15%? As you’ve employed statistical terms in your statement, do you recognize the enormity in this number? What it means, in effect, is that your confidence level has been set at 0.85 implying that for every 100 hospital admissions 15 people die! Such a situation is not acceptable in Medicine! Think about that!

  • Dr.Dan

    Some primary health facilities keep patients until the situation out of hand before referring to UCH. If your clinic do not have the facility to manage a patient, don’t waste precious time. refer on time.Early diagnosis and treatment is key to survival. If patients are referred on time, I believe with the equipments and expertise in UCH the percentage mortality would be lower.