Protesters attempt to enter court hearing “Allah” case in Malaysia

Muslims in Malaysia say it is their exclusive right to use the word Allah.

A group of Muslims on Wednesday threw water bottles and attempted to enter Malaysia’s Federal Court hearing a case on whether or not non-Muslims can use the word “Allah”.

The crowd became agitated when it learned that the court had deferred making decision, said a witness who asked not to be named.

The court did not say when a decision would be made.

An estimated 200 people from organisations that support Malay supremacy, such as Perkasa, gathered in front of the court building in the federal capital of Putrajaya.

They are gathered to defend their view that the use of the word “Allah” is exclusive to Muslims.

Police calmed the restive crowd and pushed it away from the building.

The controversy started in 2008 when the Government prohibited the Catholic publication, The Herald, from using the word “Allah” and the church filed a court case questioning the order.

On December 31, 2009, the Kuala Lumpur High Court lifted the prohibition, noting that the church had a constitutional right to use the word in its publication.

The word can be used on the ground that religions can be practised in peace and harmony.

The government appealed the case and in October, the Court of Appeal ruled that only Muslims can use the word “Allah”, reversing the High Court ruling.

The Catholic Church challenged the appeal court ruling before the Federal Court.
(dpa/NAN)


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