Okorocha bans Imo monarchs from speaking in English at functions

Imo State Governor, Rochas Okorocha
Imo State Governor, Rochas Okorocha

Governor Rochas Okorocha of Imo has banned traditional rulers in the State from speaking in English at official functions and while conducting affairs at their palaces.

Mr. Okorocha gave the directive while handing over letters of recognition and staffs of office to 19 newly recognised traditional rulers in the State in Owerri on Tuesday.

He directed that every monarch must only speak in Igbo at functions and in their palaces, adding that interpreters could be employed if the need arises.

The governor said this was in a bid to ensure that the Igbo language did not die as predicted in some quarters.

He also told traditional rulers in the state to be agents of peace, progress and prosperity in their respective domains instead of being tools of disunity and destabilisation.

He warned that any traditional ruler who could not show genuine leadership in his autonomous community would have his Certificate of Recognition and Staff of Office withdrawn.

The governor further encouraged the new traditional rulers to help the government to develop the resources of the state while urging them to rule equitably.

“Every community requires an Eze to function effectively as the head of the Community 2Government Council. Today, that responsibility has fallen on you.

I urge you not to fail as failure is not an option and I encourage you to help the government in developing the resources of our land.

“Remember that to whom much is given much is expected. This whole exercise you must understand is not an election or appointment to enable you distinguish between those who love you and those who hate you.

“Today, you are an Eze, and you must be the Eze for everyone both those against you and those who were for you. I advise you to take all of them along and embrace peace.

“Your first assignment should be to invite those who were against you to make peace in your land as no Eze can function effectively if there is no peace in your land,” he said.

Delivering a vote of thanks, Lucky Ajoku of Ihiagwa Autonomous Community, promised that they will embrace peace.

Mr. Ajoku also pledged the support of the monarchs in helping the government attain the lofty ideals of the Community Government Councils in their various communities.

(NAN)


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  • uzorgood

    This traditional ruler stuff is an archaic idea, and has no place in modem culture. They are drawback and contribute nothing to the economy. I am of the opinion that if any community wants to maintain a traditional ruler, good luck to them, but they should do so at their own expense. When the Americans declared independence, they dropped all traditional title stuff that was inherited from Britain, and it is still so till this day. But today in Nigeria, especially Igboland, communities that never had a traditional ruler are making one up so as to get their share of state budget.

    • Ajike Ole

      Traditional titles in Igboland were not inherited from the British neither were they Igbo communities without traditional rulers. The Ezes or Ezies were from the families that migrated to a community first and become kings and royal. This practice predated colonial imperialism in Igboland. These Kings are not and cannot be appointed by any governor but strictly by inheritance. But okorocha is talking about chiefs which are creation of British imperialism. Thanks.

      • Ajike Ole

        Also traditional rulers are very useful as they are the epitome of the people’s culture. But people like you see America as a standard but all cultures are unique and we cannot all be Americans. Thanks

  • atakamosu

    When a Governor can ban these so called traditional rulers, then they are no longer needed in society. They have outlived their usefulness, and government should not fund their parasitic pockets.

    • larson

      Agree with you, a hundred percent. So-called traditional rulers of today are just a parasite. Imagine that Ebony governor bought a Toyota Land Cruiser for every traditional ruler in the state.

  • Owejah

    Thank God a-beg! E get as dia english dey sound sef!

  • Julius

    Lm aooooooooo, Chei, Igbo folks with their grammar self. You need to hear them speak. I’m surprised that they are not calling the governor an illiterate.

  • Wale

    “Mr. Okorocha gave the directive while handing over letters of recognition and staffs of office to 19 newly recognised traditional rulers in the State in Owerri on Tuesday”.

    “Newly recognized”; Red cap sale will surely go up, as many more chieftaincy and lolo titles will be bought and sold.
    Since they are new; I think they should have been made “community leaders”, that’s how Obama started his journey to the white house.

  • emmanuel anizoba

    “Governor Rochas Okorocha of Imo has banned traditional rulers in the State from speaking in English at official functions and while conducting affairs at their palaces. He directed that every monarch must only speak in Igbo at functions and in their palaces, adding that interpreters could be employed if the need arises. The governor said this was in a bid to ensure that the Igbo language did not die as predicted in some quarters.” Queries for the Governor: 1. Do all the component communities of Imo State speak one Igbo dialect? 2. Can these monarchs keep records in this unique and common Igbo dialect? There are currently living/spoken Igbo dialects but no living/spoken Igbo Language. Unlike the living/spoken Yoruba Language the Igbo-Izugbe contraption is dead on arrival for not being a living/spoken dialect. The living/spoken Yoruba Language will survive the test of time because it is the living/spoken Oyo Yoruba dialect. The current Igbo-Izugbe will, like Latin, go the way of artificial contraptions – natural inexorable death. The Governor should lead by example and attempt running the affairs of his State in his so-called Igbo Language.