How Nigeria can overcome Boko Haram insurgency – Researchers

FILE PHOTO: Mother and child in an Internally Displaced People's camp Yola, Adamawa state.
FILE PHOTO: Mother and child in an Internally Displaced People's camp Yola, Adamawa state.

Some Nigerian researchers have called for more community participation if Boko Haram is to be defeated.

The researchers stated this while presenting a book titled ‘Community Resilience to Boko Haram Insurgency’ to the public on June 30.

The book, authored by Princess Hamman-Obels, was targeted at placing insurgency affected communities at the centre of interest. It was presented in Abuja by Kole Shettima, Director, Africa Office, MacArthur Foundation.

The lead research coordinator of the book, Jibrin Ibrahim, suggested key steps to tackling the insurgency in Nigeria.

The don, a civil society activist, said there was need to understand what has sustained the Boko Haram insurgency and how local communities can play a role in battling the insurgency.

“The use of security agencies to quell the insurgency will be a very important step, (but) is in itself not sufficient to solve it,” he said.

“This is because at the end of the day what we know is that this insurgency emanated from the community and it is the community that has both the responsibility but also and above all the capacity to end it,” he added.

Mr. Ibrahim also explained the reasons for the research that led to the book.

“I think the first important issue that led us the carry out this research was the seriousness of the insurgency itself,” he said. “We have not had such devastation in Nigeria since the civil war of 1967-1970.

“Over 20,000 people have been killed, at the height of the insurgency, over three million people have been displaced from their homes, their homes have been destroyed, their means of livelihoods taken away from them,” he said.

The researcher also highlighted some of the major findings of the research.

“The Borno State 2010 education census revealed that only 23 per cent of children of primary school age were going to primary school. This meant over 70 per cent of the children of primary school age were not going to school and that was already the lowest in the country.

“One of the things that struck us at the beginning of the research process was to try to understand the geography of what was going on. There was high level of insurgency attacks in certain areas and in certain communities than in other areas,” Mr. Ibrahim said.

The professor added that the researchers also observed different levels of attacks across the north-east and north-west states.

“We were interested from a research point of view, trying to understand the differential that explained why there were so much variation in what was going on. We found for example that Jigawa State had very low level of insurgency attacks while to its east in Yobe, there was high level and to its west in Kano, there was relatively high level.

“So why was it there were so little attacks in Jigawa and much more in the states surrounding it; and we thought it was interesting to follow the lead to see whether there was an objective to explain that differential”.

“The narratives of the Boko Haram insurgency have really been about the insurgents creating mayhem and the security forces, trying to contain that mayhem and in the process creating some mayhem of their own. There have been very little narratives about the people themselves. What is their narrative, how do they understand what happened to them and what most importantly were they doing or not doing in terms of the crisis they find themselves in?” Mr. Ibrahim said.

In his remark, Y.Z. Ya’u, the Executive Director, Centre for Information Technology and Development, CITAD, reiterated the relevance of the research to contemporary Nigeria.

“As illustrated, Nigeria is facing so many challenges: cattle rustling, community clashes, and ethno-religious complains, and so on.

“So, in general, the resilience of Nigerians as a community, is actually very weak and therefore what can we do to enhance the resilience of Nigeria as a community.

“But of course, we know Nigeria is a collection of communities, so our focus is what we can do to communities to enhance their own resilience,” Mr. Ya’u said.

Mr. Ya’u said no single community in Nigeria has zero resilience and no single community is excellently resilient.

He said resilience can be dormant in communities that are weak or be highly present in communities that are strong.

“The logic of our study was to study communities that are either strong in terms of resilience and those that are extremely weak,” he added.


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  • Historeey

    Premium Times Editor,

    Nigeria: State of the Nation

    Today, there are now 28 million un-employed youths in Nigeria just roaming
    purposelessly inside Nigeria – a staggering figure equal to the entire population of Ghana;
    a neighbouring West African country, according to a latest official bulletin issued by the federal
    Nigerian Bureau of Statistics. The jobless figure today is over half the whole population of Nigeria
    at independence on October 1st, 1960.

    The jobless youths in Nigeria are no longer waiting to be preached to;
    or taught to be patient by those robbing the treasury in government state houses. The youths
    are bracing for pistols, rifles and revolvers, to impose a solution on a dysfunctional country.
    Blood flows in Ikorodu in Lagos state in a bloodbath to mirror the carnage in Borno state.
    It matters not the motive of each gang. What’s key is that Nigeria is the common target.
    A country that forces its youths to arm and kill for survival or for political preference
    will sooner or later have Biafra all over the place by other means.

    • Factora & Figura

      COST OF LIVING IN NIGERIA TODAY UNDER BUHARI:

      • Minimum wage in Nigeria………………………………………….₦18,000 per month.
      • A bottle of Coca Cola soft drink…………………………………₦80.00k per bottle.
      • Smallest can of Baygon insecticide………………………..₦1,200 per tin.
      • A tin of TITUS sardines……………………………………………₦270.00 per tin.
      • Rent of three bedroom apartment…………………………₦450,000 per annum.
      • A packet of St.Louis Sugar………………………………………₦550.00 per packet.
      • A 25kg bag of garri as staple food………………………..₦14,000 per bag.
      • Petrol for six hours of private electricity…………………..₦60,000 a month.
      • Cost of preparing soup for family of six…………………..₦6,000 every two days.
      • Ceeway drinking water ………………………………………₦550 per gallon.
      • School fees for a child in private school………………….₦2 million per session.
      • Cost of two (2) newspapers a day for information……….₦15,000 per month.
      • One packet of Solpadeine headache tablets……………..₦5,400 per packet.
      • Cost of filling up a salon car with petrol……………………..₦10,700 to fill up a car.
      • Private sector graduate starting salary………………………₦80,000 per month.

      • Massob & IPOB

        We are tired
        of being a part of Nigeria. There is nothing for us here. We want a better
        place for our children and grandchildren. Nnamdi Kanu is the right man
        to lead this cause. He is not materialistic and has been anointed by God to
        lead us to Biafra. He has a lot of angels by his side, guiding him from all the
        evil that people are planning. Nothing can stop Biafra, not even an Igbo
        Presidency. We support Nnamdi Kanu and all those Igbos who refuse to support
        him are doing so because of the things they get from the Buhari government.
        Biafra struggle is no small one, and now, we are ready to die for its
        actualization
        .”

        ………..Umuahia residents’ street protest declaration

        [July 1st, 2017]

      • Abdullah Musa

        Contains many fake assertions.
        Is 2m naira school fees the average?

        • George

          Our children aren’t Almejiri’s like yours.

          We like top not average or backward like your tribe.

          Yeye Ram back out here

          • Abdullah Musa

            If I want to abuse you I can.
            But that is not my upbringing.
            But you show your lack of education even though you are literate.
            First, you are not the author of the ‘factora and figures’.
            Second, you do not know a thing about how generalisations are arrived at :
            Just because there is Dangote and an Otedola in Nigeria, so we say all Nigerians are billionaires?
            Unless someone is mentally sick, even hatred ought to have guiding principles.

  • George

    Boko haram isn’t going is the reward for the Northerners for all the evils they have committed against the rest of the country.

    Boko haram is Heavenly soldiers destined to wipe out any good things in the north.

    God has a way of answering prayers by turning your enemies against themselves.

    The three Northerners states boko haram has the footage produces the most wicked muslims ever in this country except Sokoto where this animal buhari originated.