UK parliament votes in favour of early national election

British Prime Minister, Theresa May
British Prime Minister, Theresa May

Britain’s parliament voted by 522 to 13 on Wednesday in favour of Prime Minister Theresa May’s plan to hold an early national election.

Britain had not been due to hold a national election until 2020 but Ms. May said on Tuesday she wanted to bring that forward to June 8 in order to strengthen her hand in Brexit negotiations with the European Union.

She needed to win the backing of more than two thirds of parliament’s 650 members in order to hold an early election.

Ms. May had called on parliament to back her demand for an early election, saying the vote was a chance to heal divisions in Britain before starting divorce talks with the European Union.

She surprised allies and opponents on Tuesday when she announced her plan to bring forward an election that was not due until 2020, saying she needed to strengthen her hand in the negotiations which will reshape Britain and Europe.

Addressing a rowdy parliament, she said moving the election would avoid a clash of priorities in the most sensitive final stages of the two-year talks, ignoring criticism from opposition politicians that she was opportunistic and untrustworthy.

“I believe that at this moment of enormous national significance there should be unity here in Westminster, not division,” Ms. May told parliament.

She formally notified the European Union on March 29 of Britain’s intention to leave, and has said she is confident of reaching a deal on the terms of withdrawal in the two years available.

She said on Tuesday she had “reluctantly” come to the decision to call for an early election because of political division in Westminster, criticising opposition parties for trying to thwart her plans for leaving the EU.

“What do we know that the leader of the Labour Party, the leader of the Liberal Democrats and the leader of the Scottish nationalists have in common?” she asked parliament.

“They want to unite together to divide our country and we will not let them do it.”

But for Scotland’s first minister, Nicola Sturgeon, the move was a “huge political miscalculation” that could help the Scottish National Party’s efforts to hold an independence vote.

“If the SNP wins this election in Scotland and the Tories (Conservatives) don’t, then Theresa May’s attempt to block our mandate to give the people of Scotland a choice over their own future when the time is right will crumble to dust,” said Ms. Sturgeon, who heads Scotland’s devolved government.

Ms. May, who has described herself as “not a showy politician”, also said she would not take part in television debates before the election, preferring to talk directly to voters.

“I will be debating these issues publicly across the country,” she told parliament.

“We will be taking a proud record of a Conservative government, but more than that we will taking our plans for the future of this country.”

(Reuters/NAN)


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